I am a photographer. www.aliceproujansky.com

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pulitzerfieldnotes:

Guido did make friends, and realized that many of his classmates were immigrants too. But his challenges aren’t over. Blanca is one lost job away from poverty, and her employers are moving away this summer. Her commute is long, and what will Guido do when school is out?

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.
Pulitzer Center grantees Alice Proujansky and Alissa Quart worked together on the project The Nanny’s Child.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Guido did make friends, and realized that many of his classmates were immigrants too. But his challenges aren’t over. Blanca is one lost job away from poverty, and her employers are moving away this summer. Her commute is long, and what will Guido do when school is out?

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.

Pulitzer Center grantees Alice Proujansky and Alissa Quart worked together on the project The Nanny’s Child.

Where I Teach on Tuesdays

Here are more pictures I took while teaching after-school photography in a large, NYC public school. Middle school is just awash with sublimated sex stuff and kid control and iconography and pizza.

Once I asked a sixth grader to explain why pizza was so fun for the youth and he looked at me like I was crazy and said “Because it’s mad flavory.”

And it is!

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Guido loved soccer and was popular at home, but he asked his mother for a basketball so he could get to know the game his classmates liked to play. He dreaded attending a new school with 2,400 English-speaking strangers.

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.
Pulitzer Center grantees Alissa Quart and Alice Proujansky collaborated for their Pulitzer Center-supported project The Nanny’s Child.


Behind the scenes of a story I photographed for The Nation.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Guido loved soccer and was popular at home, but he asked his mother for a basketball so he could get to know the game his classmates liked to play. He dreaded attending a new school with 2,400 English-speaking strangers.

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.

Pulitzer Center grantees Alissa Quart and Alice Proujansky collaborated for their Pulitzer Center-supported project The Nanny’s Child.

Behind the scenes of a story I photographed for The Nation.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Photojournalists always post photos from plane windows. But I was shooting the domestic side of an international story, so all I have for you is my car window framing Queens. 

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.
Pulitzer Center grantees Alice Proujansky and Alissa Quart worked together on the project The Nanny’s Child.
Who Takes Care of the Nanny’s Kids? Parents and children divide to survive by Alissa Quart, published in The Nation.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Photojournalists always post photos from plane windows. But I was shooting the domestic side of an international story, so all I have for you is my car window framing Queens. 

Image and text by Alice Proujansky, via Instagram. New York, 2014.

Pulitzer Center grantees Alice Proujansky and Alissa Quart worked together on the project The Nanny’s Child.

Who Takes Care of the Nanny’s Kids? Parents and children divide to survive by Alissa Quart, published in The Nation.

Where I Teach on Tuesdays

Throughout the year, I photographed in the New York City public high school where I taught an after-school photo class.

Where I Teach on Tuesdays

I taught a photo class for some middle school people last year, and I took pictures of them. (The photo of me in blue pants is by my student Nella.)

Picking the kids up from daycare, training for a run in honor of a friend lost to leukemia, bathing a child – small actions that add up to a life.

(More photographs of Jen as a working mother here.)

And then working mother Jen was back at work, running a press conference about discriminatory policing, speaking to members of the media, and pumping (and washing breast pump parts in the sink). Jen pushes herself hard at work and in her personal life. 

She was glad to be back working on a cause she cares deeply about. But she felt the pressure to get a long list of tasks done in the two days her baby is at daycare each week, and wondered if she would ever feel she was doing enough for her children and her career. 

Here are photos of working mother Jen, on her first day back at work since she had her son. The morning was hectic and rushed, but everyone made it out of the house (and Jen remembered all of her breast pump supplies). She was excited about being around other people and using her intellect more, but she felt a strong pull toward her kids as she left them at a local daycare. Jen’s working two days a week now, but her days in the office are intense and the work tends to leak into her days at home with baby Wiley.

Working mother Jen got three months of maternity leave from her job as the communications director at a non-profit that advocates for civil rights. She spent her time nursing and changing her son, and going for walks while listening to podcasts.

Her three year old daughter Olive attends a local daycare, and Jen and her husband Dan would meet up to walk home at the end of the day.